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2016

Breaking new ground in the fight against Rhino horn and ivory smugglers

This World Rhino Day, the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) is breaking new ground in the fight against rhino horn and ivory smugglers. The EWT’s expert wildlife sniffer dogs, Belgian Malinois Renaldo and German Shepherd Condor, have honed their skills in detecting rhino horn and ivory in the cargo warehouses at OR Tambo International Airport over the past two years. However, for the past few months, they have upped their game as they have been trained to detect rhino horn and ivory using the MECHEM Explosive and Drug Detection System, or MEDDS (also known as the REST or RASCargO), which Kirsty Brebner, EWT Rhino Project Manager, describes as a whole new ball game.
Conventional detection dogs physically sniff the target, be it inside suitcases, packages, vehicles or whatever other medium is being used to transport and hide the contraband. MEDDS technology, on the other hand, uses a remote detection system whereby air from the container of interest is drawn in situ by a vacuum pump onto a special filter which is then presented to the dogs in a specially set up clean room.

This method was originally developed, and has been very successfully used, in the high volume cargo market, particularly where it is difficult for conventional detection dogs to work, such as shipping ports. However, it has mainly been used to detect relatively volatile substances such as explosives and drugs which are likely to emit a relatively large number of volatile organic compounds into the air compared to comparatively inert substances such as rhino horn and ivory.

The MEDDS method comes with considerable additional costs for items such as the filters, as well as trained personnel. It has never been rigorously tested on these more inert substances in real life situations. The trial that the EWT has been running, along with Afri Guard dog handlers and trainers, is designed to change that, and to provide answers for once and for all as to whether MEDDS technology is an option for detecting rhino horn and ivory in shipping ports, which present a challenging environment for law enforcement.

Nick van Loggerenberg, Afri Guard Training Manager says: “Training of the dogs has gone really smoothly, as they are already imprinted on the rhino horn and ivory. We trained them using the MEDDS system, and experimented on extraction times, the climatic variations, and different containers and boxes. We have extracted the samples and presented them to the dogs as much as two days later, and the dogs readily found the positive, proving that the method is working properly. We’re very excited by how well Renaldo and Condor, who are used to fast paced work, are searching!”
These two heroic dogs will soon be sent to an undisclosed port location to put their training into practice as part of this critical trial that, if successful, will provide another vital tool to tackle the smuggling of wildlife contraband in previously inaccessible locations.

This work is made possible by the support of Afri Guard, TRAFFIC, Royal Canin, Hollard Pet Insurance, and Relate.

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2016

Driving Change: Protecting the Protected

23-08-2016

South Africa currently has a serious problem with regards to road-related fatalities, and this epidemic is relevant to wildlife too. Insurance claims suggest that approximately R82.5 million is paid each year against collisions with wild animals, though the costs to wildlife of these collisions are never calculated. So what are the consequences for animals? The Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) is tackling this question and working to find solutions to the problems associated with wildlife and transport infrastructure.

 

Perhaps the most obvious concern is the direct and negative consequences of vehicle-wildlife collisions, more commonly known as ‘roadkill’. Reports via social media platforms from members of the public show a high level of public disquiet and emotional concern about the rate of road deaths in parks, including issues related to speeding and careless driving, and the conservation impacts and wildlife welfare risks such driving poses. To take a closer look into the problem the EWT launched a new project in 2014 aimed specifically at wildlife and road issues in nature reserves and parks.

In 2014, Pilanesberg National Park was the first reserve to support the initiative, where many wildlife species including leopard and zebra have been killed on the roads. Following this, research continued in Addo Elephant National Park in 2015. The research team set out to monitor driver behaviour through placing a fake snake on the road, and recording how many times it was ‘hit’ and the speed at which the vehicle was travelling.  We found that approximately 50% of drivers hit the fake snake. “From our survey, it seems that observation levels of the driver, rather than the speed of the vehicle, is the key factor in causing roadkill,” explains Wendy Collinson, the Project Executant of the EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project.

 

Armed with a better understanding of the reasons why roadkill may be happening in national parks, the research team have returned to Pilanesberg National Park to undertake follow-up work. “A driver awareness campaign is to be launched in parks to make drivers more aware of animals on the roads themselves,” Collinson commented. “We plan to test a number of awareness-measures with visitors to the park and to assess which method works best. This will guide us on future decisions in other parks that will improve the quality of the experience of park visitors and safeguard the animals in these protected areas,” she concluded.

 

The EWT is also excited to announce that the project has expanded to Hluhluwe iMfolozi Park through a joint collaboration with the University of KwaZulu-Natal and Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, as well as Table Mountain National Park, where preliminary roadkill surveys have begun. “We are also eagerly awaiting the start of some surveys to begin in Kruger National Park, with support from the University of Mpumalanga and SANParks,” stated Collinson. “There is an urgent need to better quantify and understand the impacts of roads on wildlife in protected areas and to develop and test methods to manage these. Ultimately, through understanding the causes of roadkill, this project will guide further research, specifically for recommended roadkill-reduction measures in other protected areas in South Africa.”

 

The project is novel, unique and innovative in its design since it also uses volunteers or citizen scientists to assist with data collection. Citizen scientists are becoming more recognised by wildlife researchers as a support to expert data collection. To galvanise public participation to this process, the EWT has taken to the internet to get people to report wildlife fatalities.  The EWT has a Smartphone app, Road Watch, which allows data to be quickly and accurately captured, assisting people to easily submit their information. Other social media platforms include Facebook and LinkedIn.

 

The EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project in Protected Areas is supported by Bridgestone SA, Copenhagen Zoo and Mikros Traffic Monitoring. Collaborations include: Mpumalanga University, University of KZN, North West Parks and Tourism Board, South African National Parks and Africa:Live.

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2016

Putting African Road Ecology on the Map

29-07-2016

Eight African road ecologists are off to France later this year to attend the fifth Infra Eco Network Europe (IENE), an international conference on ecology and transportation. IENE is a network of experts working with various aspects of transportation, infrastructure and ecology. The network was initiated in 1996 to provide an independent, international and interdisciplinary arena for the exchange and development of expert knowledge, and with the aim to promote a safe and ecologically sustainable pan-European transport infrastructure.
The EWT first attended the conference in 2014, the first time Africa has been represented, and where we were the proud recipients of the prestigious IENE Personal Achievement Award. This was to recognise our achievements in communication, awareness raising and new projects for mitigating the impacts of roads on wildlife in South Africa. It was a huge honour to receive the award and to be recognised by so many leading experts in the field.

Our attendance at the 2016 IENE conference will see a flood of presentations from African road ecology experts organised into a ‘special Africa session’. This will be the first time that so many representatives from Africa have attended an international conference on this subject and it was made possible with the support of the French Foreign Ministry, the French Embassy in Tanzania, the French Embassy in South Africa, the Fondation pour la Recherche sur la Biodiversité and the IENE Programme Committee.

We will be presenting on our work conducted in South Africa and Tanzania highlighting three of our roadkill mitigation projects; using low-level fences to reduce roadkill in the Greater Mapungubwe Transfrontier Conservation Area for amphibians, reptiles and small mammals, and in Noordhoek, Cape Town for the Endangered Western Leopard Toad, with the third project that uses bridges over roads to reduce samango monkey roadkill in the Soutpansberg. Two other presentations will showcase our five-year project that undertakes an assessment of roadkill in protected areas. We will also be presenting our findings of roadkill data gathered through citizen science, and the value of data in making decisions for conserving biodiversity on roads. Driver behaviour and attitudes towards animals on roads is poorly understood and research undertaken in Tanzania will be one of the first studies to present this, whilst the positive benefits of roadkill will also be discussed and how it can assist in identifying parasites.

This will be the first time that so many voices from Africa will be heard at one forum dealing with matters of road ecology and it is hoped that there will be opportunities for collaboration with other international experts in this field. We hope to learn more about roadkill–reduction methods that have been successfully trialled in other countries so that we may adapt and apply them here. We also hope to share some of our good practices that are ‘leading the way’ in promoting human-vehicle-safety in South Africa as well as conserving wildlife through a reduction in wildlife-vehicle-collisions.

The EWT’s Wildlife and Roads Project is supported by Bridgestone SA, N3 Toll Concession, Bakwena Platinum Corridor Concession, De Beers Group Services and Mikros Traffic Monitoring. Collaborations with the listed projects include: Rhodes University, University of the Free State, University of Limpopo, University of Venda, North West Parks and Tourism Board, South African National Parks, Lajuma Research Centre, Toad NUTS Volunteer Group, and Centre for Wildlife Management Studies, Tanzania.

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2014

Engaging communities in the fight to save Rhino

The Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), Wilderness Foundation and KwaZulu-Natal Ezemvelo have joined forces to embrace communities living on the outskirts and within the grounds of national parks and game reserves, as partners in the fight to save rhino. The organisations have developed an educational DVD aimed at communities living and working in and around reserves which contain rhino entitled ‘Uma uhambo lwabo luphela nolwethu lophela’ (Should their journey end so will ours), which focuses on highlighting the direct link between community livelihoods and saving rhinos.

“There is no single solution to addressing illegal wildlife trade, which is an increasing global phenomenon, estimated to now be the third largest illegal industry worldwide after drugs and human trafficking. Wildlife trade often has its roots firmly established in organised and trans-boundary crimes. For this reason the EWT’s Rhino Project is implementing interventions at several stages in the poaching and wildlife trade chain and this DVD addresses one of the first links in that chain as it focusses directly on the role of communities who are often exploited by wildlife crime syndicates,” said Kirsty Brebner, the EWT’s Rhino Project Manager.

The DVD was researched, directed and edited by Samson Phakathi, Senior Field Officer for the EWT and Mandla Buthelezi of the Wilderness Leadership School and was filmed in and around Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife parks and reserves.

“It is crucial that we reach out to the individuals and communities who rely on our wildlife heritage for their everyday survival and empower them with the knowledge that the precious biodiversity of our country belongs to them as well. It is important to note that the long-term wellbeing of all South Africans is dependent on ending wildlife crime,” concluded Samson.

The DVD, partly sponsored by the Rhinose Foundation, was produced by African Renaissance Productions and is available in Zulu with or without English subtitles. The DVD highlights the links between wildlife and community livelihoods as well as the cultural and environmental importance of rhino. It has been designed as a tool to be used in community engagements and outreach projects. The battle against rhino poaching and wildlife crime is far from over and we urge you to keep demonstrating your support for the work of the EWT and other reputable NGOs and organisations.

For further information about the DVD and to secure a copy please contact Kirsty Brebner at kirstyb@ewt.org.za.

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2014

The EWT Welcomes the News of a Million Dollar Fund for Frogs

Amphibians are at the forefront of what is being widely referred to as the sixth mass extinction event on earth. Around a half of over 7,000 amphibian species are in decline, a third are on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened species, and more than 120 species are thought to have been lost in recent years. Disease and climate change have been implicated in the sudden and rapid disappearance of species from South, Central and North America, Europe and Australia – but the primary threat to the survival of many amphibian species is the rampant loss and degradation of habitats, such as rainforests. In the tropics, where the entire range of a species may be as small as a single stream, amphibians often fall through the cracks in protected area coverage and a recent study revealed that 940 amphibian species worldwide occur in unprotected habitat.

“As a consequence, we at the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) are particularly excited about the announcement of the Leapfrog Conservation Fund, which is aimed at strategically protecting and managing key habitats for frogs, salamanders and caecilians over the coming year.  The Fund has been created by the Amphibian Survival Alliance (ASA), Rainforest Trust, Global Wildlife Conservation and the Andrew Sabin Family Foundation and will prove a crucial source of funding for our work with southern Africa’s threatened amphibian species,” said Dr Jeanne Tarrant, Manager of the Endangered Wildlife Trust’s Threatened Amphibian Programme (EWT-TAP). “As an official partner of the ASA, the world’s largest partnership for amphibian conservation, it’s really exciting to see such a bold new step in the quest to save amphibians”.

This summer has been a particularly busy and successful field season for EWT-TAP. “Since September we’ve been working around the clock at various sites for our two focal species: the Amathole Toad from the mountains of the Eastern Cape, and Pickersgill’s Reed Frog from coastal KwaZulu-Natal. The hard work has paid off, with new localities for both species being uncovered. In both cases, we’ve also received reports through citizen science, demonstrating that interest and knowledge about these extremely rare species is growing. Both species are Red Listed by the IUCN as Critically Endangered, meaning that the species face an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild. The best way to prevent this from happening is through protection of crucial habitat and this is where the Leapfrog Conservation Fund will prove invaluable,” commented Tarrant.

For further information about the EWT-TAP please contact Jeanne Tarrant on jeannet@ewt.org.za.  For more on the Leapfrog Conservation Fund, please visit the Fund’s webpage or contact Robin Moore at rdmoore@amphibians.org.

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2014

Come warm yourself this winter at the 3rd annual Chrissiesmeer Crane Festival!

23-04-2014

Nestled in the heart of South Africa’s Lakes District, the little village of Chrissiesmeer in Mpumalanga derives its name from the adjacent Lake Chrissie, the largest natural freshwater lake in South Africa. Located within a radius of 20 kilometers around Lake Chrissie are approximately 300 lakes and pans. The area was declared as a Protected Environment earlier this year and is home to all three of our threatened crane species – the Grey Crowned Crane, the Wattled Crane and the Blue Crane. The area is also known to hold more than 20 000 water birds on a regular basis.

This charming little village will, as part of its growing eco-tourism market, be hosting the 3rd annual Chrissiesmeer Crane Festival from the 12th to the 13th of July.
The objective of the festival is to increase environmental awareness among visitors, the public, and local communities about the importance of Chrissiesmeer’s biodiversity, including the cranes and their wetland habitats while boosting the tourism potential of the area by highlighting its unique characteristics. It is a great destination for birders and nature lovers in general, photographers, anglers and cyclists, to name but a few.

The festival will cater for all with a variety of activities from field trips to browsing through stalls and exhibits, a Beer Fest, educational talks, and local traditional dancing. In celebration of the area’s Scottish history the festival will be concluded with an evening of fine cuisine, a whiskey tasting and a colourful Scottish Fireplace Concert at the popular Florence Wedding Venue.

The event is hosted by Chrissiesmeer’s Eco-tourism Association, with support from the Endangered Wildlife Trust which, together with farmers in the area, is actively working towards the conservation of this unique Protected Environment and its biodiversity.

 

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2014

The Endangered Wildlife Trust and Fauna and Flora International partner to mainstream biodiversity into business in South Africa

26-05-2014

The Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) and Fauna and Flora International (FFI) are proud to announce their joining forces to support businesses in South Africa to address biodiversity issues in their operations. The signing of a formalised, strategic collaboration to mainstream biodiversity into business signals the recognition by these two organisations of the synergies that exist in relation to their work in the private sector and they have joined forces to leverage off of each other’s existing networks, connections and best practice learning.
“The EWT approaches mainstreaming biodiversity into business through the National Biodiversity and Business Network (NBBN) and its strategic partnership with various businesses.  The EWT supports companies in implementing solutions at several levels throughout the business’s operations and its supply chain.  We aim to set best-practice standards in terms of making biodiversity a core business focus and concern within the private sector and profile businesses and partners who make efforts and achieve successes in this area,” said Dr Marie Parramon-Gurney, the EWT’s Head of Conservation Business and facilitator of the Network.

FFI protects threatened species and ecosystems worldwide, choosing solutions that are sustainable, based on sound science and take account of human needs. Operating in more than 40 countries worldwide – mainly in the developing world – FFI saves species from extinction and habitats from destruction, while improving the livelihoods of local people. Founded in 1903, FFI is the world’s longest established international conservation body and a registered charity. FFI also works with the private sector to build long-term strategies for environmental management.

“FFI believes that business value is gained through the knowledge that resources are not being depleted and impacts are within limits acceptable to local communities, customers and investors alike. We work with businesses and the influencers of business across a range of sectors to create an environment where the private sector has a long-term positive impact on biodiversity conservation,” commented Pippa Howard, Director of FFI’s Business & Biodiversity Programme.

The EWT and FFI have been collaborating on the business and biodiversity agenda over the last two years. FFI became a supporting partner of the National Biodiversity and Business Network (NBBN) and the alignment of vision and work between the EWT and FFI was evident.   The organisations will share and combine their respective expertise to ensure that companies in the region fully appraise and manage their direct and indirect business risks, opportunities and dependencies related to biodiversity.

“This collaboration will ensure that companies in the region are provided with comprehensive assistance, training, information, as well as direct strategic and operational support and tools based on international practices around mainstream biodiversity. This collaboration is one of the first in the region and it will enable the up scaling and consolidation of our efforts to ensure that biodiversity is regarded and managed as an essential asset for economic and social development by the private sector and government,” concluded Dr Parramon-Gurney.

 

For further information about the partnership please contact Dr Parramon-Gurney on mariep@ewt.org.za.

Contact:

Dr Marie Parramon-Gurney
Head of Conservation and Business
Endangered Wildlife Trust
Tel: + 27 11 372 3600
mariep@ewt.org.za

or

Nomonde Mxhalisa
Communications Manager
Endangered Wildlife Trust
Tel: +27 11 372 3600
nomondem@ewt.org.za

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2014

RARE MUSSEL FIND IN THE NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE!

01-07-2014

During a recent Cape Critical Rivers survey of the Endangered Clanwilliam Sandfish in the Northern Cape’s Oorlogskloof Nature Reserve, live specimens of the fresh water mussel Uniocaffer were discovered in the Reserve for the first time. This record is also only the second recording of live mussels in the entire Northern Cape Province.
Team members from the Cape Critical Rivers Project, a partnership between the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), the Department of Environment and Nature Conservation (DENC), CapeNature and the Freshwater Research Centre (FRC), were netting and measuring fish when Bonnie Schumann, the EWT’s Drylands Conservation Programme’s (EWT-DCP) Senior Field Officer, was thrilled to extract the first live mussel nestling in the gravelly riverbed.Ms Schumann explains, “What made me stop mid-fish-count and go off with a digging stick was I happened to look down and there alongside me were the remains of a fairly recent meal in the form of an opened mussel with bits of stringy meat on it! Otter-left-overs unexpectedly provided sure proof there were mussels in that pool!”

These mussels have shown a sharp decline in numbers and distribution in recent years, and as a result are listed as Near Threatened by the IUCN, highlighting the conservation importance of the Oorlogskloof Nature Reserve as a sanctuary, not only for endangered fish species and Bokkeveld Sandstone Fynbos, but also for freshwater mussels. Across the rest of the mussel’s range pollution, siltation, water abstraction and a decline in water quality are all thought to be contributing to the decline of this species. Fresh water mussels are considered to be an indicator of the condition of the fresh water systems they inhabit as they are sensitive to negative changes in these systems.

Initial identification of the species was done by Dr Helen James from Rhodes University and Professor Corrie Wolmarans from North West University. Dr Ruhan Slabbert from the Stellenbosch University confirmed the identification of the species by DNA sequencing.  Voucher specimens of the mussels have been lodged in the National Freshwater Snail Collection and in the Albany Museum collection where they will be available for future research.

The Cape Critical River Project partnership, made possible through IUCN SOS funding and the Elizabeth Wakeman Henderson Foundation, is responding to the challenges facing our fresh water ecosystems and is implementing actions to protect critically important fresh water ecosystems in the Cape Floristic Region. The Oorlogskloof River is a priority river due to the presence of several endangered indigenous fish species, most notably the Endangered Clanwilliam Sandfish Labeoseeber. Management actions already being implemented along the Oorlogskloof River to conserve this valuable catchment will also benefit the newly discovered mussels. For further information about the Cape Critical River Project please contact Christy Bragg onchristyb@ewt.org.za

Anybody sighting fresh water mussels shells in the Northern Cape can report these to the Mandy Schumann from the Oorlogskloof Nature Reserve at bokkeveld@gmail.com or on 027 2181159. Sightings in the Western Cape can be reported to Martine Jordaan from CapeNature at mjordaan@capenature.co.za

Contact:
Christy Bragg Manager: Drylands Conservation Programme
Endangered Wildlife Trust
Tel: +27 (0) 82 332 5447
christyb@ewt.org.za

and

Nomonde Mxhalisa
Communications Manager
The Endangered Wildlife Trust
Tel: +27 11 372 3600
nomondem@ewt.org.za

Image Credit: Mandy Schumann

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2016

Critical water resources gobbled up by alien invasive

05-02-2016

As South Africa continues to battle the drought which is further impacting on already scarce water supplies, the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) is implementing measures to conserve wetlands – a primary source of fresh water – and to prevent the loss of water resources to alien invasive plants.

Since long before the era of the Egyptian Pharaohs, wetlands have supported the livelihoods of successive generations of African communities. Despite all the social, economic and technological changes that have taken place over the centuries, communities across the continent continue to depend primarily on wetlands for water, food and fibre. Two of the most important wetland ecosystem services affecting human wellbeing involve fresh water availability and fish supply.

The principal supply of renewable fresh water for human use comes from an array of inland wetlands. Physical and economic water scarcity and limited or reduced access to water are both major challenges facing South African society and key factors which could limit sustainable economic development. Apart from providing goods and services to humans, wetlands have for millennia provided breeding and feeding habitats for birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians.

The Chrissiesmeer Protected Environment (which forms part of the protected area network of South Africa) comprises over 300 lakes and pans, as well as other wetland types. Due to its richness in wetlands and water birds it is a proposed Ramsar site (wetland of international importance). Many of our threatened bird species depend on wetlands for their survival. These include the Grey Crowned Crane which uses the Chrissiesmeer wetlands for breeding in the summer months. The health of these wetlands is negatively impacted by invasive alien plants such as Black Wattle and bluegum trees, which take up huge amounts of water which would otherwise have flowed into the wetlands, thus impacting negatively on the amount of water available within the wetlands for use by plants, animals and humans.

Ursula Franke, Senior Field Officer for the EWT’s African Crane Conservation Programme notes that there is a visible difference in water quantities when comparing wetlands where alien invasive clearing has not been undertaken to that in cleared wetlands.

Communities living within the Chrissiesmeer Protected Environment can celebrate the start of a new invasive alien clearing project this World Wetlands Day (2 February). Funded by the Department of Environmental Affairs, the project will focus on local job creation through the clearing of invasive alien plants, and will be undertaken in partnership with Eastern Wetland Rehab.

This will ensure the improved health of the wetlands and surrounding grasslands and thus have a positive impact on water availability for communities and cranes within the Protected Environment. The value of this is especially pertinent during this current dry period.

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2014

Eskom & EWT rescue birds in Vredendal

18-09-2014

The Eskom/Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) strategic partnership has gone out of their way to protect a Jackal Buzzard and two chicks close to Vredendal in the Western Cape.

On the morning of the 4th September 2014 at 03:30 AM, Eskom had a line trip on the Juno Farmers 1 line which left 6 towns and numerous customers without electricity. Upon closer inspection, it was determined that a bird nest containing two young chicks was the cause of the outage.  The EWT had recently conducted Wildlife Interaction Training at the Vredendal Customer Network Centre(CNC), where Eskom employees were taught how to manage wildlife interactions on electrical infrastructure, and who to contact for advice.  This led to the senior supervisor at Vredendal CNC, Werner Olivier, contacting Constant Hoogstad, the Endangered Wildlife Trust’s Wildlife and Energy Programme manager to ask for assistance.

Although several suggestions were put forward on how to resolve the outage problem, one thing was common for both Eskom and the EWT that the nest should not be removed. Lourens Leeuwner from the Eskom/EWT partnership was dispatched to the scene to assist and suggested that the course of action with the least disturbance would be to re-route the power line in order to protect the nest and chicks. Although Jackal Buzzards are not endangered, they play a vital role in the sensitive, arid landscape surrounding Vredendal.

Eskom staff worked tirelessly throughout the day to ensure that the new section of the line was up before dark, with Lourens Leeuwner from the EWT keeping a careful eye on the two chicks in the nest, and the adult buzzard to ensure that the bird did not abandon the nest.  Once power was restored, all materials were packed up and the area was vacated.  On the morning of 5th September 2014 Lourens Leeuwner returned to the site to find the adult bird sitting on the nest with the two chicks, who all appeared to be in good health.

“Electric utility structures provide nesting sites for some bird species. Depending on where nests are located, they may pose fire, safety, power outage, or an electrocution risk to birds. The Eskom/EWT partnership would like to salute Werner and his team down at Vredendal CNC, as well as Dikobiso Moeketse and Astrid October from the Western Cape Operating Unit(WCOU) Environmental wing for the strong environmental ethic they have installed under the Eskom staff in the WCOU,” concluded Hoogstad.

 

 

Contact:

Constant Hoogstad
Programme Manager: Wildlife and Energy Programme
Endangered Wildlife Trust
Tel: +27 11 372 3600
constanth@ewt.org.za

and

Lillian Mlambo
Communications & Brand Manager
Endangered Wildlife Trust
Tel: +27 11 372 3600
lillianm@ewt.org.za